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Tag: fine motor

Halloween

Halloween Activity

Happy Halloween month! At BDI, the therapists have been incorporating Halloween vocabulary throughout their sessions!  This simple activity of stickers and real image vocabulary card can be used to target all different areas of communication, fine motor skills, and visual processing.  Targeting holiday specific vocabulary can help your child communicate in their community.  Why?  Because our kiddos are seeing Halloween items everywhere (i.e pumpkins on walks in their neighborhood to spooky spider displays at the grocery store)!   The following are examples of ways to achieve different developmental goals by using the same activity.

Halloween Bingo

Matching

Starting out, simply matching the animated sticker to the real image is a perfect way to help teach reality vs. fantasy and to make sure the child isn’t just memorizing one specific image!

Imitation

The child imitates the vocabulary word and receives the sticker to mark as “complete”.

Independent labeling

The child labels the Halloween card or sticker independently

Receptive identification

If your child is a great talker but needs to work on his/her listening skills, you can ask your child questions!  For example, you can ask your child “where is the cat?” or “which one is round and orange?”.  Columns or rows can be covered to reduce the amount of items he or she is scanning.

Image description

After basic labeling is mastered, you can have your child be more descriptive with their request.  The child can request the “black cat” sticker, “scary spider”, “two bats”, “silly pumpkin” etc.

Simple requesting

“I want + vocabulary word” or “Can I have + vocabulary word”

Complex requesting

“I want the purple hat”; “I want the scary ghost”

Articulation

Try finding all the final /t/ sounds in these fun Halloween words!

Are you looking for more ideas on how to make every day activities a little more festive?  Join our Talk and Groove class to learn about more ways to help your child develop their language and fine motor skills at home!

Occupational Therapy

Pediatric Occupational Therapy

Questions about BDI Occupational Therapy?

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BDI Occupational Therapists

Our Occupational Therapists are trained to identify barriers that restrict a child’s success or independence in completing everyday “occupations”

What is a child’s occupation?  

  • Play independently 
  • Be successful in school
  • Easily adapt to change and problem solve
  • Complete self-care tasks
  • Effectively communicate to maintain great relationships with family and friends 
  • Learn beneficial behavioral skills, such as accountability, empathy, concentration, and self-esteem  

Occupational Therapy can help your child improve:

  • Fine motor skills

    Precise hand movements
    • Holding pencil/crayon
    • Manipulating toys/small objects
    • Clothing fasteners
  • Emotional Regulation

    The ability to control one’s own emotional state. This is the ability that allows one to self-calm during emotional and stressful situations. In children, emotional regulation issues are often seen as ‘behavior problems’
  • Range of Motion

    The amount of movement a joint or body part has
    • Limited movement in hands/arms, head, legs, or other body parts
    • Difficulty straightening limbs
  • Strength

    Core Strength

    • Sitting still or sitting without support
    • Climbing/running/jumping
    • Balance
    • Frequent falls

    Arm/Hand Strength

    • Turning doorknobs
    • Opening containers
    • Holding a pencil
    • Carrying multiple objects
    • Maintaining hold on objects
  • Self Care

    Activities of daily living
    • Dressing
    • Eating 
    • Bathroom hygiene
    • Chores
    • Planning
    • Decision making
  • Sensory Processing

    Ability to receive and respond to aspects of our environment

    Sensitivities to:

    • Sights
    • Sounds
    • Movement
    • Taste
    • Touch 
    • Smell
  • Visual Perceptual Skills

    The ability of the brain to understand what the eye is seeing
    • Reading
    • Puzzles
    • Reversing letters/numbers
    • Visual scanning (example instead that doesn’t use the medical term)
    • Sorting
  • Visual-Motor Skills

    Hand eye coordination

    • Handwriting (letters/numbers)
    • Drawing/coloring
    • Cutting
    • Ball skills





Occupational Therapy can help improve

  • Fine motor skills

    precise hand movements

    • Holding pencil/crayon
    • Manipulating toys/small objects
    • Clothing fasteners
  • Bilateral Coordination

    using both hands or arms together to complete tasks

    • Jumping jacks
    • Throwing/catching a ball
    • Pull/push toys
    • Crafting (cutting, glueing, etc…)
  • Visual-Motor Skills

    Hand eye coordination

    • Handwriting (letters/numbers)
    • Drawing/coloring
    • Cutting
    • Ball skills
  • Visual Perceptual Skills

    the ability of the brain to understand what the eye is seeing

    • Reading
    • Puzzles
    • Reversing letters/numbers
    • Visual scanning (example instead that doesn’t use the medical term)
    • Sorting
  • Self Care

    activities of daily living

    • Dressing
    • Eating 
    • Bathroom hygiene
    • Chores
    • Planning
    • Decision making
  • Sensory Processing

    ability to receive and respond to aspects of our environment

    Sensitivities to:

    • Sights
    • Sounds
    • Movement
    • Taste
    • Touch 
    • Smell
  • Strength

    Core Strength

    • Sitting still or sitting without support
    • Climbing/running/jumping
    • Balance
    • Frequent falls

    Arm/Hand Strength

    • Turning doorknobs
    • Opening containers
    • Holding a pencil
    • Carrying multiple objects
    • Maintaining hold on objects
  • Range of Motion

    the amount of movement a joint or body part has

    • Limited movement in hands/arms, head, legs, or other body parts
    • Difficulty straightening limbs
  • Emotional Regulation

    the ability to control one’s own emotional state

A-Z of our OT Services

A

Autism

Attention

ADLs (activities of daily living)

B

Body Awareness

Bilateral Coordination

C

Core Strength

D

Dyspraxia

Dysgraphia

Dressing skills

E

Eye Hand Coordination

Executive Functioning Skills

Emotional Regulation

F

Feeding

Fine Motor Skills

Fine Motor Coordination

G

Gravitational Insecurity

Grip Strength

H

Handwriting

I

IADLs (Instrumental Activities of Daily Living)

M

Motor Planning

P

Postural Control

Play

R

Reflex Integration

ROM (Range of Motion)

Routine Management

S

Self Care

Sensory Processing 

Safety Awareness

T

Toileting

V

Visual Motor Skills

Visual Perceptual Skills

Great Feedback from Great Families

BDI Playhouse has exceptional therapists… my son was evaluated at BDI and received Occupational Therapy – and loved his therapist at BDI! I cannot say enough about the entire staff. Qualified, caring, exceptional people.”

Getting Started With Occupational Therapy

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Still not sure? Learn more about whether your child needs therapy here

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